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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
be a fish or bird or species of some kind or for his spirit must rethink about the environment and our place an icon of the species of concern became honest. what we were doing to the environment and to ourselves in the process. so i think when we look back five decades in the rearview mirror, we can actually see the beginnings of this change in the way we think about the natural world. i call rachel carson a tipping point between these two things. she had a strong presence in the conservation movement and was really an effect founder of the modern environmental movement. i think it's possible to point to a specific movement in time when that happened, when we begin to think about our environment and relationship to the tiered it came in the late summer of 1962 a month before "silent spring" was published. in june 1962 from "the new yorker" magazine published excerpts from "silent spring" and through the course of the summer, huge controversy flared up around the book and people began to take sides, and people began to become worried about what carson was warning everyone about. by the end o
, again, to cap public spending, reduce taxes, to create a favorable environment for corporate. and let me say that france has a lot of advantages. nice infrastructure, good infrastructure, demography, people with skills, a good level of education. we can take advantage of that, even compared with our peers so let's do everything we can to -- the benefit of these positive advantages and not be -- not present people to invest in france because they might be afraid of a lack of visibility on the taxpayers or too high taxes. >> but do you think it's sending the right signal to investors when it's threatening to nationalize a factory? >> no, certainly not. these are not the right ones and clearly what an investor needs is, again, confident. immediately going forward, illustrate will not suffer from taxes or a potential threat. the message should be positive for investors, not just french one, but also we have a strategy to reduce stability. >> but do you understand some people could be forced to leave the country because of increasing back pressure? >> there is a lot of debate around that. my
environment. the third sister was alan. she lasted both of resistors and is working for skinner at the time of the flood and is a stronger character of the book and after words help to salvage his silk and she moved to holyoke and ultimately married his bookkeeper. after the flood the valley could potentially be somebody else's gain. after the disaster the valley was a popular spot for investors and capitalist. investors came as far away from omaha nebraska to give them incentives to relocate to other areas. one of the most vocal voices was from holyoke massachusetts. they were ingenious lee is specifically designed for industry. it was hoped to be greater than the urban centers. holyoke was the greatest potential power of new england. the dam the connecticut river on the right is at the crest of a 60-foot fall capable of generating 30,000-horsepower that was the power of 300 mills. the cotton lords that created holyoake devised a three tiered canal system. it does not show on this map the connecticut river could be used over three times. holyoke made offers to the manufacturers in the vall
can't get mad all the time. you create a totally negative environment. nobody wants to bring you bad news. nobody wants to pay attention and they are afraid of you. you never want to work in the environment of fear or anxiety. i want people to like me. it doesn't mean they are my buddies, but i want to have likeness in the organization and i want mutual respect. i respect you and you respect me. it's not brain surgery. >> i want to read two sentences that seem to be loaded to me. i learned a second lesson from the beer and barracks. surround yourself with ground troop experience whose thinking is not contaminated with grand theories. before we invaded iraq we should have listened to more people with ground troop experience. these people were out there and fewer idea-heavy big egos in washington. >> there were a number of people in the administration and outside and the think tank world that surrounds every administration and all you had to do was take on saddam hussein and baghdad and all would be well. others thought differently. i recommended that he ought to look at a lanler force
together. it was very much a family environment. the third sister to come work for skinner was ellen littlefield. now, ellen outlasted both of her sisters at the mill, and she was working for skinner at the time of flood. she is the strongest female character in my book. after the flood. >> she also worked with skinner helping to salvage his silk, and she moved to holyoke and ultimately married his bookkeeper. now, after the flood the valley's loss was going to be or could be potentially someone else's gain. so after the disaster happened, the valley was a very popular spot for investors and capitalists. offers came from all over, from as far away as omaha, nebraska, to the manufacturers that had lost everything giving them incentives to move elsewhere and to relocate to other areas. one of the most vocal voices in this choir was that of holyoke, massachusetts. and holyoke was an ingeniously-designed city, specifically designed for industry. it was hoped to be even greater than the urban mill centers of lawrence. holyoke was considered to be the greatest potential mill power in new e
. that was the environment i grew up in and i felt very comfortable when bill asked me to finish the book. again silly me, i thought i can do this. whether it is hubris or no. host: what did you think he saw in you that he hadn't seen in any of the other possible writers? guest: we did talk about that. he was adamant, he told me -- because i didn't encourage him -- he said bill try to find somebody. he said no, it is like a mother giving away his child to be raised by another. i said bill if he doesn't both the mother and child will die. he would say nice try, no. i mentioned a historian and he said i don't want a historian. if i wanted anyone i would want a writer. this was maybe 2000, 2001. said when he sasked, he paul you are a father writer, you have written 500, 600 feature stories and that is where i started. he saw the journalist as the same tools as a hitch. get a source, get a second source and put it together but first and foremost when all of that is assembled, tell a story that would pass the campfire test i call it of a bunch of folks sitting around a campfire. that was his genius as storytell
that was happening in the area. a number of different things in environment that we had no idea. later, many kids in my neighborhood, i worked at the plant myself. got a sense of what it's like to be on the inside of the plant. there was one evening when i came home, from work at rocky flats, and turned on the television and it was a show on "nightline" that it was an exposÉ of what was really happening at the plant. and it was the first time that a really have an awareness, really have an understanding of what was happening at rocky flats and how extent -- extraordinary the contamination was but it was on that day i decided to quit my job at rocky flats come at the day i decided i would write a book about it. it took me about 10 years of research and writing to pull the story together. and i wanted to write a book that reads like a novel, but is very heavily footnoted come everything in the book is factual. so you can check back and see where the information comes from. but i wanted to write this story from the perspective of all of the different kinds of people whose lives have been affected b
about the entire financial environment in the country? >> i think washington's playing with fire. i don't think they realize this is not a game. people right now are unsettled, and they are not certain about the future, and they are adjusting budgets because people plan right now. job creators make their budgets for next year now. dagen: right. >> we're deciding how many people to hire. i have a buddy in rhode island running a factory with 500 employees and told the four department heads give me plans for 20% across the board cut if the fiscal cliff hits. i mean, this is the wrong posture. we don't want people that create jobs, people that decide how many people will be hired in the next year to be having -- to have bad karma now. we want people looking forward in a positive way, how we're going to grow into new markets, how to export more. we need the country to be more competitive so we can export to china, mexico, export to canada. that's critical, growth. if we have growth, we hire more people. dagen: drew, thank you, great to see you. happy new year. >> thank you, go rg iii. dagen:
at an environment that is as bullish for the broad american public as it might seem, looking at the stock market. >> dan, one of the, kind of a side follow, there have been 312 stimulative easings of one policy stimulus and central bank easings over the last 16 months over the world. that's extraordinary. 312. so one's answer to this question may be that there's an awful lot of money sloshing around from central banks around the world who are saying, look, we've got to drive this company and they're opening the spigots. >> they are, but the question, what is happening to that capital. is it deployed for productive uses? i think in the case of the united states we've seen what's been written about is that many companies have spent hundreds of billions of dollars buying back their own stock. they've been borrowing this money cheaply and using it to buy back their own stock, rather than investing in productive capital projects and there's a cool of thought that says most of the growth in the stock market has been because companies have been net buyers of stock, whereas retail investors and the mutu
on officially. i come from an environment developed by the late senator who came to nebraska and fought for the legislature and officially was non-partisan. some people say he did it because he wanted to save money. the main reason he did it was to get rid of the conference committees that we go through back here. the work is a pile up on the football field. it changes hands five times before they blow the whistle. what we have in nebraska is officially nonpartisan and works. that is a backdrop for me. when i came here in a partisan environment, i said, i do not have to subscribe to a non partisan environment. my goal was one nebraska, not a republican or democratic or east or west. i represent all the people, even those who voted against me. i have taken that independent approach back here. i have to represent all of the people. >> did you ever contemplate becoming an independent? >> no, because the democratic party never pushed me out. i have been well excepted by the democrats in nebraska inaccepted by the democrats in nebraska. ultimately, the democrats did not leave me, so why woul
women do quite well in those types of environments. technology helps both allowing people to handle different aspects of their lives but it can be a great environment to have a fulfilling career. >> you have worked with a very interesting, strong man. what is that like? any tips? >> larry summers, mark zuckerberg, at the white house. it's very interesting all these big guys want you to run their staff. how you handle them? -- how do you handle them? >> the common thread in a lot of the relationships with strong man is a kind of openness. by having that openness, you develop a real, trusting relationship. this is both with women and men, but i think one of the unique features of mark zuckerberg, he basically live the mission of the company, give people the power to connect and share to make the world more open, and he lives by that. he sits in the middle of our campus and his conference room is a glass box. >> does he come in every day? >> every day. he rarely travels. you cannot get him out with anyone else, but he is just sitting there living the mission. >> what is he doing? >> if
-show host bill bennett. and a look ahead at the political environment in 23,
made the trains run on time. that was the environment that i grew up in and i felt very comfortable when bill i asked me to finish the book. again, silly me, i thought i can do this. whether it was hubris or not -- >> what do you think he saw i knew that he had not seen in any of the other possible writers? >> we did talk about that. he told me once -- he said, try to find someone. he said, this is like a mother giving away her children to be raised by another. i would say, bill. he would say, nice try, but no. he said "if i wanted anyone, and i do not, i would want a writer." later, when he last, he said "paul, you have written 500, 600 feature stories. that is where i started." he saw the journalists as having the same tools as the historian when it comes to sourcing. when all of that is assembled, tell a story that would pass the campfire test, i call it, a bunch of folks sitting around a campfire. and i guess he liked my stories. >> so, if you had to pick out of this book your favorite story, what would they be? >> i enjoyed his battles over the american second front and when to
partisan political environment. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> it's all downhill from there. [laughter] my lawyer will take any complaints later. thank you so much, and thank you to what, for what you all do here. i am a, i shopped here as a young washington monthly editor. shopped is too strong. we didn't have any money. as you all may remember, washington monthly editors were paid $10,000 a year which, as kate boo -- who won the national book award last night adding to her amazing list of of accomplishments -- kate used to say she knew she had actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy entrees as well as appetizers in restaurants. so i never actually spent money here, but i'll try to fix that. i am enormously grateful. i am a southerner, i'm from tennessee and think that understanding jeffson in his regional context as well as his national context and his political context is hugely important. he was a master of politics whether it was idealogically driven or geographically driven, and i think there's something resonant about a ferociously-divided atmosphere, b
the question of canada to be cut? is it politically possible in this environment to get enough republicans and democrats to support a deal that the white house wants on deficit reduction? because they been to the altar so many times on this same issue, taxes, medicare, social security, defense spending, you must wonder, if there's any agreement possible. host: first, commented today from the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell, who will join his colleagues later today at the white house. [video clip] >> i told the president last night we would be happy to look at whatever he proposes. the truth is we are coming up against a hard deadline. as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. republicans are not about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats before or just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that would not be fair to the american people. that said, we will see what the president has to propose. members on both sides will review it. then we will decide how best to proceed. hopefully, there's still time for an agreement of some kind
future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we can correct what i have come to view as a very mistaken and ultimately counterproductive idea that has captured the business world. this is the idea that corporations are run well, when they are run to maximize shareholder value, specifically measured by share price. many people in the room may have the reaction, but isn't that something that has been accepted forever? don't we all know that the purpose of the corporation is to maximize profits for shareholders? i would say no, actually, that is not an idea that has been around forever. that is a pretty new idea. if you were to get in a time machine and go back and study the first eight decades of the 20th century, and it is at the beginning of the 20th century were refer start to see the great public corporations that we think of today when we think of corporations
environment. host: an editorial responding to and preparing for natural disasters is one of government's most important functions. it's as lawmakers should provide immediate relief without having to worry about demanding that spending to cut elsewhere. jan in springfield, mass., on the line for democrats. caller: 5 would like to say in florida in 2004 when they had all of the hurricanes, state farm insurance pulled out of the state and refused to ensure homes. people that have car insurance with state farm wanted to cancel their insurance. we found out the weight state farm is judging each state -- we found out state farm is judging each state. there are states where they are not making a profit so they are not insuring. global warming and new storms, the insurance companies need to look at their policies and unite them as americans. please quit referring to us as "ordinary" and referred to us as the backbone of the nation. guest: i was born in massachusetts, so i certainly feel you are part of the backbone of the nation. there is not reformed insurance policy coverage in this bill. a big pro
and consulates. but in today's threatening environment, we have to take a new and harder look at the capabilities and the commitments of our hosts. we have to re-examine how we noter the places facing emerging threats where national security forces are fragmented or may be weak. so at secretary clinton's direction, we have moved quickly to conduct a worldwide review of our overall security posture with particular scrutiny on a number of high-of threat posts. with the department of defense, we've deployed five interagency security assessment teams made up of diplomatic and military security experts to 19 posts in 13 countries, an unprecedented cooperation between our departments can at a critical time. these teams have provided us a road map for addressing emerging security challenges. we're also partnering to send on 35 additional marine detachments. that's about 225 marines to medium and high-threat posts where it'll serve as visible te tenderness to hostile tacts. this is on top of the approximately 150 detachments we have already deployed. we are aligning our resources to our 2013 budget reque
environment, that energy would burst forth. host: jkl tweets in, raising the top tax rate will not make a dent in the annual deficit. money gravitates to tax write-offs and crafted loopholes. guest: that is what you are seeing happening in europe when they are raising tax rates. lower the rates, get rid of these massive deductions, and you would see a cleaner code, a less corrupt code. host: valerie in new jersey on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. the more i listen to mr. forbes speak, i am reminded why the reasons why i have lately not been a consistent viewer of c-span anymore. they twist the truth. there is no integrity in what is said anymore. if you look at the record of spending -- mr. forbes mentioned mr. obama's spending being higher than the bush years. that is not true. the deficit which increases our debt grew so much under obama because he put both wars into the budget. george bush kept them out of the budget, was not paying for them, so things looked good. in the first few years of the obama administration, he created more jobs than george bush did in eight years. ge
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)